Tools for Authors: Kindlegraph

I’d planned to write a post about the difference between yWriter and Scrivener but because of a number of things (including the snopocalypse in western Washington), I haven’t put enough time into using Scrivener to feel that I’d do a fair job of it.  So instead, I’d like to spotlight a tool called Kindlegraph.

Kindlegraph is a tool that allows authors to autograph e-books, at least those formatted for Kindle.

How it works:

1) You sign up as an author, preferably using your Twitter account.

2) Upload your books.  The site will search the Amazon database for you so this part is fairly easy.

3) When you have an autograph request, it will pop up (within about a minute, in my experience) in your inbox.  Click on that and you will see the name of the person who requested your autograph.

4) Go to “sign” the book.  This screen will look like the one below: 

Image

Here are a couple of things to know about signing your book.  First, Kindlegraph will force you to put something in that top box.  If you want the entire inscription to show up in your handwriting, I’d recommend just putting a period there.  

Secondly, you’ll have to write everything in that second box using your mouse.  Unless you’re fantastic with a mouse or trackpad, my advice?  Try it with a tablet.  Or resign yourself to having the signature of a first-grader.

I initiated the process myself and discovered a couple other things from the fan perspective.  The kindlegraph can’t be edited or resent by the author once completed (if any of you find differently, please let me know).  

The other thing–and this isn’t obvious–is that Amazon may bounce the signature back if it thinks that it’s spam.  In that case, the reader may never get their signature from you.

To avoid that, I recommend you tell readers in advance to add the email signature “@kindlegraph.com” to their approved senders list for Kindle.  This can be found by using these settings: 

1. Visit Manage Your Kindle page.
2. Sign-in to Amazon account. 
3. Go to “Personal Document Settings” under “Your Kindle Account”.
4. Under “Approved Personal Document E-mail List” click “Add a new approved e-mail address”.
5. Enter the e-mail address to approve and select “Add Address.”
6. Instruct the sender to resend the document. 

Is Kindlegraph a good tool?  I think it will be.  I can’t count the number of people who have said they were waiting for print in order to get a signed copy.  Those publishing in e-only might like this tool for that reason.

But does it have far to go?  Yes, I think that having no ability to resend autographs is a major problem.  I’d like the ability to edit as well, should the signature somehow get written incorrectly (misspelled names, etc).  But this is definitely a step in the right direction.

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6 thoughts on “Tools for Authors: Kindlegraph

    • I don’t have my Kindle yet but was able to set it up by going into Amazon and finding my iPod’s Kindle address. But I will forewarn you that you need to be extra-cautious to make sure that you have Kindlegraph added to your email list before you request. 😉

  1. Gwen – If you would like to be able to actually autograph an ebook, I invite you to check out Autography (www.autography.com). Provide your fans with truly personalized copies of your work, not just a PDF file of the signed cover. Sign ebooks in person, sign them virtually, heck, sign them in your bathrobe.

    Here’s an example of what can be inserted into a fan’s ebook, taken from Jonathon King’s signing at this year’s Bouchercon. Very personal, very memorable.

    • Thanks, Robert. I’ll take a look at it. When I find out more about the program, I’ll likely write about it as well. As I noted above, Kindlegraph has some limitations so I’m curious about other tools that exist.

      • Thanks for the Facebook “Like”!

        We’re hoping to have some videos posted up soon that show how the system works. If you want to shoot me an email, I can reply back with a link to some quick/simple videos we made that should give you a feel for how things work. We’d also be more than happy to chat with you (phone, Skype, whatever), and we’ll be at Digital Book World in NYC next week.

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